Veggie burgers are life, and other tales from Budapest, Hungary

Hello lovely people!

Today from my very hungover bed (I just napped for three hours, today is going great) I’m going to be finishing up the story of my latest interrail trip. Our third and final city was Budapest, the first of the three that I’d never visited. Budapest is comparable to Prague due to it’s traditional Eastern vibe, and for me resulted in some of my favourite times of the whole tour.

received_10209009303869853
Personally I think we look quite fresh here considering this was the morning after we slept on floors and buses all night

How It Went Down

I finished my last post by saying that Flixbus saved our trip to Budapest, but there’s a little more to it than that. Our bus was due to leave Prague at 2am, which when the subway stops running at midnight was not ideal.

Let me tell you the story of how we travelled to the suburbs of Prague, got kicked out of the subway station, then got kicked out of the carpark we took refuge in, slept on the streets, and even got our passports checked by the police. Yes, I can say that I spent a night falling in and out of sleep in a sleeping bag on the Czech streets, huddling with my friends for warmth. Whilst it wasn’t the most pleasant night I’ve had at times, it was also completely hilarious and looking back it makes for one hell of a story.

Our first bus finally arrived an hour late, and it was pretty hot and uncomfortable. Still, I slept most of the way to Brno, where we changed buses for the final leg of the journey. Brno at 6am was an experience; some walking to work, some coming back from a night out, some (aka us) wandering around sleep deprived and a bit confused. Our second bus was much nicer – it even had WiFi and plug sockets!

We arrived in Budapest at nearly midday, in desperate need of a shower and some sleep. But, as our prophet Oli Sykes once said “sleep is for the weak”, so I just got on and kept exploring.

 

The Hostel

This hostel was run by a lovely man who made every effort to make us feel welcome. Toucan Hostel was the cheapest at £12 per night, for a very light and open-feeling 8 bed room.

The only other people I saw the whole time we were in this hostel were a father and daughter making fish fingers one evening, which is probably a good thing considering we spent most of our time in that hostel shouting at each other over games of cards. In fairness though it would be quite difficult to meet people here, as the only communal space is the kitchen (which, on the plus side, is very well stocked).

Our main issue with this hostel was that the showers didn’t drain properly, so you couldn’t run the water for too long in fear that the place would be flooded. But, the central location and close proximity to Tesco more or less made up for this for me.

Wait… What Actually Happened?

After the pretty taxing night we’d just had we decided to keep day one pretty chilled, with a trip to the Gellert Baths. Budapest is, for some reason, famous for having heated baths. I have no idea why, but I won’t question it, because they’re so nice! As someone who looks more like a dog than Michael Phelps when swimming I appreciated the baths, as it’s all about sitting around in warm water rather than who can do the most lengths. However, the main thing I loved about the baths was the architecture (which won’t surprise anyone), as the place is filled with beautiful stone columns and mosaic walls. Also, the wave pool is my fave thing ever and every home should have one.

 

Day two was again handed over to Natalia, as our Eastern European tour guide. Armed with a map and vague plan we visited some of the main landmarks in the city. We started the day at St. Stephen’s Basillica, a very impressive Catholic church which heads up one of the city’s squares. After a scheduled ice cream stop (the plan was tight, snacking was only allowed in designated areas), we moved on to Budapest Castle – a personal architecture highlight. One of my favourite things is that on one side of the castle you get amazing views of the Danube, yet on the other you see the reality of the city – towerblocks and somewhat run-down housing. I found that a refreshing break from tourism, a reminder that these countries, however beautiful, still have a wealth of social issues.

After seeing the Hungarian Parliament Building we took a boat down the Danube to our lunch spot. In Budapest for whatever reason the public transport people have decided that adding boats to their offer is a fabulous idea. Whilst yes, we didn’t pay any more for it, I still didn’t like it. Boats are a bit terrifying in my opinion.

 

If you’ve ever seen anyone go to Budapest on Instagram you’ll know that one of it’s big highlights is ruin bars. Located in the Jewish Quarter, these bars are built into abandoned buildings, shops or lots, and they’re really damn cool. We visited Szimpla Kert, the biggest and oldest ruin bar, and I loved how eclectic the place was. I also appreciated a bit of traditional Hungarian Palinka (cherry brandy) to round off a lovely afternoon.

The final evening of the trip was spent climbing Gellert Hill, with the aim of watching the sunset with a picnic and drinks. Thanks to my classic bad luck it was very cloudy and even rained for a bit, so the sunset was basically impossible to see. But hey, we had alcohol to rectify the problem, so all was good. This evening was not only a trip highlight, but a life highlight. I sat surrounded by my best friends watching over the lights of Budapest, discussing life, our adventures and everything in between. It was honestly magical for me.

 

Fast forward a few hours and I’m asleep on the floor again, this time in Budapest International Airport. Our flights left at 6:30am, and because yet again the local transport was unhelpful, team UK had to arrive at the airport 6 hours early. I loved sleeping in the airport so much that I’m taking my snooze tour to Manchester Airport next month when I fly back from Milan and have to wait 6 hours for the first train home.

But Really Are You Eating Tho?

I pretty much made this whole section just so I can talk about veggie burgers. I really love veggie burgers. Anyway, we were looking for somewhere to eat on the second day as we had no plans, and after abandoning the meat eaters us vegetarians stumbled upon Istvanaffi. It’s like a combination of the choice at Subway and McDonald’s, except instead of Big Macs it’s oat burgers. Everything is vegetarian/vegan, it’s cheap, filling and delicious!

img_20180709_144145_922
Still dreaming about this meal

I literally have nothing else to put here because I’m almost certain every other meal I ate was from Tesco so… shout out to Hungarian Tesco and reminding me of doing my weekly shop in Durham?

 

And so the trip drew to a close, with me as usual not recovering fully before 7 days straight in work. I can’t pick a favourite city, but I know that I have so many favourite moments from this trip – from domesticated family arguments about carrier bags in the Budapest hostel to dance routines in a Czech carpark at 1am. Travelling does crazy shit to people, but I wouldn’t ever change it.

 

-Megan, listening to The Story So Far because pop punk isn’t dead (and I just got back into it)

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Veggie burgers are life, and other tales from Budapest, Hungary”

Leave a Reply to ellieslondon Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s