Travelling Alone For the First Time: Frightening or Exhilarating?

Hello lovely people,

After making the decision to travel alone to Milan I had a mixed response from my family and friends. Some thought I was insane for undertaking a week of loneliness and danger, others thought it was a great choice to explore a new place exactly how I would want to. Regardless of what people thought though it felt like the right decision. I’m a pretty seasoned traveller at this point, and I don’t want to restrict myself from seeing new places just because I don’t have anyone to travel with at that point in time. So, here’s how I feel after my first trip alone.

travelling alone

My journey to Milan was, quite frankly, a bit of a trek. I had to take a 2.5 hour train to Manchester Airport, go through the airport experience on my own for the first time, fly to Bergamo, take a 1 hour bus to Milano Centrale, and take the metro to my hostel. It was time-consuming, but I can’t say I found anything too difficult. It’s really not that different to being in a group, you’ve just got to have more awareness of your surroundings. My main tip for this part is to account for the possibility of things going wrong, because when there’s only one brain working solving problems can be more difficult. My train to the airport was cancelled whilst I was on it (love our fully functional privatised rail network), but I was able to get on another one and still had time for a drink in the airport because I’d accounted to have spare time.

I opted to stay in an 8 bed mixed dorm at Meininger Milano Lambrate for a number of reasons pertaining to being a solo female traveller. I know and trust the brand, so I had the peace of mind of going to somewhere I knew would be safe. This particular hostel was located across the road from a train station too, so it meant I never had to walk too far at night. Staying a dorm was a new and interesting experience. I didn’t feel unsafe or uncomfortable at all, as most of the other people in my room were young solo travellers too. I even got chatting to a few of them, shoutout to the linguists from Oxford who quizzed me on my degree a bit too much for it to be normal. I obviously kept my belongings padlocked away at all times to make sure nothing was stolen or lost.

Being able to do exactly what you want whenever you want is such a liberating way to travel. I’ve travelled in a big group before, and whilst it’s obviously so much fun to hang out with your friends, it’s also enjoyable to be completely on your own agenda. I was able to go to museums that my friends perhaps wouldn’t have enjoyed, and didn’t feel like I was ever letting anyone down by things like getting up earlier or later on a certain day. I was also a big fan of sitting on benches or in cafes and watching the world go by for far too long, something I doubt other people would tolerate!

Eating and drinking surprised me as being one of the hardest things. I didn’t eat out very much as I felt the social stigma of being in a restaurant alone and I have a bit of anxiety surrounding ordering food (sounds ridiculous because it is). I also didn’t like that I couldn’t drink as much as I usually would on trips, because I definitely didn’t want to be even slightly drunk whilst alone. I did save money as a result of this though, so it wasn’t all a loss.

Now for the important bit – safety. I don’t think I once felt at risk. Obviously Italy is a very safe country, but it’s still dangerous to be alone anywhere at certain times of day or in certain places. I was catcalled a little bit here and there, but the sad fact is that I almost expect that now when I’m in a big city, regardless of if I’m alone or with female friends; #whyimafeminist. To stay safe I just took the normal precautions you would expect – not being out late at night, not having valuables on show, not walking around with earphones in and not giving away personal information. It can be more dangerous to travel as a woman alone inevitably, but I think as long as you take suitable measures to protect yourself you shouldn’t let it stop you.

I actually thought I would be a lot more lonely than I ended up being, as in the end I really enjoyed my own company. I was still in contact with friends and family back home as well which helped, but I was mostly distracted by all the culture and exploring so I never really got lonely. I also chatted to a lot of people in my hostel. I spent most of my evenings chilling in the communal areas, and got chatting to travellers about where they’d been and where they were headed – my favourite kinds of conversations. If I had spoken Italian I’d probably have spoken to more people when I was in the city, so perhaps socialising would’ve been more likely if I had been somewhere I spoke the language.

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Look at me with all my pigeon friends

So if I were to sum it up – travelling alone was the best thing I’ve ever done. I learned a lot about myself and how I cope with things, as well as growing in confidence even after such a short length of time away. It really was the best bit of relaxation before university and spending almost all my time with other people. Have you ever travelled alone? Would you, or would it worry you too much?

-Megan, listening to Brave New World by Iron Maiden (I rediscovered this album today and remembered how much I love it)

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Milano, Italy; The Ultimate Travel Guide

Hello lovely people,

Milano is considered the fashion capital of Europe to many, but I think it’s Italy’s best kept secret when it comes to backpacking. Situated in the Northern Lombardy region it is a vibrant and thriving city, with everything from urban neighbourhoods to Italy’s largest church. Whether it’s relaxing with an aperativo or taking a ride to the nearby Lake Como, Milano has something for everyone.

Quick Facts
Currency: Euro
Language: Italian (very few people speak English, which is great to see!)
Airports: 3 – Bergamo, Linate & Malpensa
Public Transport: Metro, buses & tram (€4.50/day)
Safety: 4/5, I travelled here alone and never felt at risk, except a few catcalls

Visit Duomo Cathedral
Duomo is far from underrated. The building is quite the feat to behold, with some beautiful white architecture. You can enter the cathedral and attached museum for €3.50, but I chose not to because whenever I looked the queues were always pretty long. I still loved sitting in the square and just taking in the architecture instead (because we all know I love a nice building).

Walk around Galleria Vittorio Emanuele II
Now, you can probably tell by the way I dress myself that I know virtually nothing about fashion, so it might seem unusual for me to reccomend the main high fashion shopping mall. However, to bang on about architecture again, it’s a stunning building. I adored the glass roof and intricate wall design, so just walking around was definitely worthwhile. I’d also reccomend going to the nearby streets for cheaper shopping, you’ll find the awesome European brands Bershka, Pimkie and Pull & Bear.

Explore Santa Maria Delle Grazie
I love me a good church, always necessary to pray the gay away (too spicy?). This one is much smaller than Duomo (obviously), so I was able to visit the quieter interior and grounds easily. Inside there were lots of different Catholic shrines and art, which I actually found really interesting.

 

Eat & walk in Semipone Park
This is a fantastic place to eat a picnic lunch and watch as people cycle through the park (why do Europeans cycle so much?). After eating my lunch I wandered a little and it was really lovely to be back in a green space after the bustle of Duomo.

Discover Isola’s street art & the Bosque Verticale
Isola was one of my favourite districts. It’s a working class area with a huge community feel that has progressively been gentrified with the introduction of industry. The Bosque Verticale is a pair of residential towers that appear to have trees growing out of them, and it’s so cool to see nature in the middle of an area dominated by skyscrapers. However, the real gem of Isola is the street art. There’s some truly stunning pieces that are best discovered by wandering, but if you’re short on time head to Porta Garibaldi station and see the way artists have made it their own.

Eat gelato at Artico Gelateria Tradizionale
Could you really go to Italy and not try out the ice-cream? Located in the heart of the Isola district, this gelateria is family-run and classically Italian. There’s lots of choice and the gelato is so tasty!

 

Visit Lake Como
Como is around an hour away by train, and definitely worth a day out. I want to write a full post on this truly stunning location, but for now I’ll just say DO IT.

Drink aperativo (tbh I’d go just for this)
The Italians have got this one right. At around 6pm bars and pubs begin to fill with people going for a post-work cocktail, but there’s an amazing catch. Buying a drink means that you’re entitled to a pre-dinner buffet! I don’t understand how this only happens in Northern Italy, because it’s fabulous. I paid anywhere from €2.50 – €6 for my aperativo depending on what drink I ordered and where I was. You cannot miss this one.

 

Head to the Navigli district to see the canals
Fair warning, this area has become a little overrun with tourist traps, but the canals were so worth it. I visited at sunset and loved seeing the sunlight reflect on the river, truly stunning. There are also a lot of small artists’ studios alongside the river to watch out for. This is considered a “good” location for aperativo, but I found that the prices were ridiculously inflated in comparison to less touristy areas, so I’d say it’s one to avoid when you’re drinking.

Learn something new at the Museo Nazionale de Ciencia e Tecnologia
This was a really interesting museum, and absolutely huge. I specifically loved their exhibits on nutrition, the history of CERN and television. As a pansy humanities student science is usually quite foreign to me, but this place was very accessible for those of us who aren’t scientifically minded. Furthermore it was housed in a great building, and I loved the way the exhibits were laid out. Definitely one to remember your student card for, as the entrance fee goes from €10 to €7.50 when you present one.

 

So it’s safe to say that I absolutely loved my trip to Milano. It was the perfect balance of relaxing and adventure before university begins again, and I would really reccomend it. Aperativo has absolutely ruined me though, when is the UK going to wake up to that one?

Have you ever visited Milano or Italy? Where should I go next?

-Megan, listening to Radio X and writing with my housemate BECAUSE I HAVE HOUSEMATES NOW AND IT’S EXCITING

My Europe Bucket List

Hello lovely people!

Can I get political for a second? Fuck Brexit. I hate it and everything it stands for, whether that be nationalism, anti-immigrant sentiment or economic liberalism. I hate that it stands in the way of defining myself first and foremost as a European citizen, and I hate that it’s almost certainly going to restrict my future. I absolutely adore Europe with all my heart, and I want to continue roaming around it’s streets forever.

My trip to Milan this week has inspired me to keep travelling, regardless of what my government want to do to stand in my way. Travelling alone has helped me find my feet and discover some amazing things and places; if I’m honest I just want to drop everything right now and disappear across Europe on my own for a while. I’ve spoken to people doing round-the-world trips, interrails, or travelling for work, and I want to do it all. So, this is where I want to go.

europe bucket list

1. Copenhagen, Denmark
Milan was very nearly Copenhagen. The flights were just as cheap and even more convenient, but accommodation and mere existing was a little out of my budget for this trip. Scandinavia isn’t an area I’ve ventured into as yet due to the aforementioned high prices, but for some reason I’m drawn to Denmark. Perhaps it’s the canals, perhaps it’s the Scandi lifestyle; whatever it is I’m determined to make it there.

copenhagen

2. Rome, Italy
Having visited Milan, Como, Verona and Venice I’ve absolutely fallen in love with Italian culture. The people are always welcoming, aperativo is the best idea anyone ever came up with, and their relaxed approach to life is something I hugely envy. I’ve chosen Rome because I’ve been recommended it a thousand times over, and it’s historical sights look amazing. Perhaps this is a linguistic trip for if I ever learn Italian…

rome

3. Andalusia, Spain
Considering Spanish is my third language I’m honestly ashamed that the only time I’ve ever visited Spain was to a holiday resort when I was about 12. It’s just never quite made it; too far off-route for my 2017 interrailing trip and too expensive for this month. My current vibe is for the region of Andalusia. After studying Frederico Garcia-Lorca in first year and getting deep into Andalusian history and culture it’s been somewhere I’ve been dying to visit.

cadiz andalusia

4. Bordeaux, France
If you know anything about me, you’ll know that my heart is firmly in France. I aim to settle there and after 3 years of exchanges over in Brittany I have a huge group of friends in that area. However, I’ve never been further south than La Rochelle, which is a huge regret of mine. Add my love of wine into the mix and Bordeaux just seems logical to me. It’s near the coast and next to a national park too so I’d love to do a more relaxed holiday there someday.

bordeaux

5. Moscow, Russia
This is the only place on this list that I’m not wholeheartedly down for. Russia (quite understandably I think) absolutely terrifies me. As an overt member of the LGBTQ+ community I’m not sure if I want to visit a country that still persecutes people like me everyday. However, I’m also big into my cold war/communist history, and Moscow really is the centre of that. Maybe someday.

Moscow

7. Cologne, Germany
I loved visiting both Munich and Berlin, but I’ve never been further west in Germany. I’d really love to see how that compares to the Bavarian culture of Munich and the heavily modernised Berlin, as well as explore the Rhine valley whilst there.

cologne

8. Barcelona, Spain
I keep saying that I don’t need to go to Barcelona, because as a linguist it’s pretty useless to me, being that its inhabitants speak Catalan. However, I don’t speak the languages of most of the countries on this list, and that doesn’t make them any less viable as destinations. I really want to see the sights of Barcelona, and after hearing stories from countless friends and family members I’d love to see how great it is for myself.

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9. Kosovo
Kosovo is politically quite turbulent, which I think is a great shame. It has a pretty negative image as a result of its civil war in the late 90s and self-declaration of independence from Serbia (which, as an aside, Serbia still doesn’t recognise, that’s nuts), but if you take just one look at it’s geography all of this blurs into insignificance. The countryside of Kosovo is absolutely stunning, and whilst it’s not the conventional walking route I’d love to hike in it’s mountains.

kosovo

10. Paris, France
9 is an annoying number so I’m adding Paris because it’s my favourite city in the world and I constantly want to be back there.

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This is by no means an exhaustive list, as given the chance I’d love to visit every corner of Europe. It’s just the places I’m dreaming of right now, as year abroad saving has pretty much halted all my travel plans until summer 2019. Have you visited anywhere on my list? Where do you want to visit next?

-Megan, listening to the new The Story So Far album (hint, it’s awesome) in Milan airport (guess who got inspired after a week off)

 

*all pictures in this post were sourced from Google Images, except the final image which is my own

My Top Packing Tips for a Short City Break

Hello lovely people,

By the time you’re reading this post I will be on the first leg of my journey to beautiful Italian sunshine in Milan. After the whirlwind of Berlin, Prague, Budapest and Truck Festival in July I couldn’t bear the thought of my summer adventures coming to an end, so I did the age old trick of searching for flights to “everywhere” on Skyscanner. £35 on a flight and £50 on a hostel later I was all set for Milan and my first ever experience as a solo traveller just before the new university term.

It’s two days until I leave right now so I thought I would share some of my top tips for how to pack light for 5 days on cabin baggage. I’m a self-confessed packing phobe, and usually leave it until the very last minute, but over the years I like to think I’ve gotten pretty good at it.

packing

Write a list

This one seems pretty obvious, but it’s something I only started doing recently. You only ever have to do it once, because aside from changing the amount of clothes you need every trip has pretty much the same essentials. Make sure you tick things off as you get them out and as you put them into your suitcase, to ensure nothing gets behind.

Invest in a good suitcase or backpack

I’m usually a backpack kind of person (I went on a week long exchange trip with a hiking backpack this year… other students were very confused), but when it comes to cabin baggage, I’m opting for a suitcase. I could have invested in an adequately sized hiking backpack, but they’re quite pricey and heavy. I also like being able to carry my “daypack” in the airport, to keep my flight essentials and clothing etc separate. Whatever you choose, make sure it’s durable and easy to transport.

Make use of staple clothing pieces

Much as the stripy top and floral shorts might look great, you’re never going to wear them together. That means you’ll end up having to take extra items to match them with, which is an unnecessary waste of space. Opt for things you can wear multiple times and combine with different items to make new outfits, such as plain denim shorts.

Wear what you can to the airport

Now, I’m not saying I’ll be trekking up to the train station with 3 jumpers and a coat on, but I will be wearing some of my more bulky items such as jeans. Chances are if you’re flying from the UK you’re probably going to need the layers on this side of your adventure too!

Keep things organised

When it comes to security obviously you’ll have to be removing all electrical items and liquids. It’s 1000x easier to do this if you know where they are and can simply pull them out of your suitcase. I also like to have all my cables in a ziplock bag, so that they don’t clutter up my bag and they’re easy to find.

Roll your clothing

This saves so much space! I even do it when I’m moving back to university after holidays, as you can pack so much more in without folding things.

Buy a microfibre towel

These are the very thin types of towels that dry much more quickly and take up way less room. Standard towels are bulky and a nightmare to get dry on the day you leave your trip, so I never take them. You can pick these up in the likes of Home Bargains for just £5, or many sports shops have them too.

 

My most important tip is HAVE FUN (cringy? yes. do I care? no). City breaks are my favourite kinds of holidays, and they’re pretty easy to pack for because they’re often so short. I probably won’t be around much for the next few days as I’m going to try and take a bit of a break whilst I’m away, so if you see me on Twitter too much please remind me to go and enjoy myself!

 

-Megan, listening to a Spotify Daily Mix (it’s really not an exciting music day today)

 

A Day in York, England

Hello lovely people!

My travel posts have been few and far between recently, because as I said in the August Edit, I just haven’t been anywhere. But eventually sitting inside your house and doing nothing all day gets really dull, so myself and my friend decided to take a trip to York a couple of weeks ago. This is what we got up to!

york

We arrived in York at around 11am, after a couple of hours of driving and a shuttle bus. I don’t usually opt for park & ride schemes as I find them a little cumbersome, but this one was too cheap to say no to in comparison to the extortionate city centre parking prices. I know you all love a good parking-based money saving tip, that’s what you came to this blog for right?

York is much like Durham. It has a cathedral, cobbled streets and a river running through it, so I felt very at home. More importantly, its traditional vibe means the city has absolutely beautiful architecture. It’s definitely one to just wander around and see what you can find, whether that be the ancient city walls or pretty side streets. The big attraction of the city however is York Minster, an extremely impressive looking building. We didn’t pay to enter the Minster, but it’s worth walking into the area before the box office to check out some of the stained glass windows, which are just stunning!

 

I wish I’d had more time to check out the city’s coffee shops, as there were some awesome looking espresso bars and places with locally roasted beans. I’m a bit of a coffee nerd, it has to be said. We did make time for lunch however, at the cafe attached to the Lawrance Apart-Hotel. It’s vibe was a little more corporate than I tend to prefer, but the prices were surprisingly acceptable and the staff very friendly! I had a mozzarella, pesto and tomato panini (vegetarian cafe staple), while Thomas opted for a bacon sandwich, which was commended for it’s value for money!

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I took a picture of my food! Am I a real blogger now?

Our main love in York however was the bookshops – God bless my bank account. The city is full of amazing second-hand bookshops which have books on everything from the history of Unilever (one of Thomas’ choices) to the specifics of what the communists were up to in Paris during the second world war written in French (no prizes for guessing that was one of my purchases). We spent a good couple of hours wandering around these places and uncovering some real gems. I’d highly reccomend Ken Spelman Bookseller for their second-hand stuff and Minster Gate Bookshop for their bargain basement (£3/4 for brand new novels? Yes please!).

 

It’s not just bookshops that York is great for though, it’s the shops in general. If you shy away from the high street you’ll come across some really quirky independent places with really friendly staff. Of course The Shambles is included in this; York’s famously narrow medieval street which is lined with some of the most fabulous smelling food shops ever! Just off The Shambles there’s also a lovely market which was again nice to wander around.

 

In conclusion if you like walking around and looking at pretty things, York is for you. For the bookshops and cafes alone I’ll definitely be making a return very soon – it’s so worth the trip!

-Megan, listening to…. actually nothing for once – THIS IS A FIRST!

 

 

 

Veggie burgers are life, and other tales from Budapest, Hungary

Hello lovely people!

Today from my very hungover bed (I just napped for three hours, today is going great) I’m going to be finishing up the story of my latest interrail trip. Our third and final city was Budapest, the first of the three that I’d never visited. Budapest is comparable to Prague due to it’s traditional Eastern vibe, and for me resulted in some of my favourite times of the whole tour.

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Personally I think we look quite fresh here considering this was the morning after we slept on floors and buses all night

How It Went Down

I finished my last post by saying that Flixbus saved our trip to Budapest, but there’s a little more to it than that. Our bus was due to leave Prague at 2am, which when the subway stops running at midnight was not ideal.

Let me tell you the story of how we travelled to the suburbs of Prague, got kicked out of the subway station, then got kicked out of the carpark we took refuge in, slept on the streets, and even got our passports checked by the police. Yes, I can say that I spent a night falling in and out of sleep in a sleeping bag on the Czech streets, huddling with my friends for warmth. Whilst it wasn’t the most pleasant night I’ve had at times, it was also completely hilarious and looking back it makes for one hell of a story.

Our first bus finally arrived an hour late, and it was pretty hot and uncomfortable. Still, I slept most of the way to Brno, where we changed buses for the final leg of the journey. Brno at 6am was an experience; some walking to work, some coming back from a night out, some (aka us) wandering around sleep deprived and a bit confused. Our second bus was much nicer – it even had WiFi and plug sockets!

We arrived in Budapest at nearly midday, in desperate need of a shower and some sleep. But, as our prophet Oli Sykes once said “sleep is for the weak”, so I just got on and kept exploring.

 

The Hostel

This hostel was run by a lovely man who made every effort to make us feel welcome. Toucan Hostel was the cheapest at £12 per night, for a very light and open-feeling 8 bed room.

The only other people I saw the whole time we were in this hostel were a father and daughter making fish fingers one evening, which is probably a good thing considering we spent most of our time in that hostel shouting at each other over games of cards. In fairness though it would be quite difficult to meet people here, as the only communal space is the kitchen (which, on the plus side, is very well stocked).

Our main issue with this hostel was that the showers didn’t drain properly, so you couldn’t run the water for too long in fear that the place would be flooded. But, the central location and close proximity to Tesco more or less made up for this for me.

Wait… What Actually Happened?

After the pretty taxing night we’d just had we decided to keep day one pretty chilled, with a trip to the Gellert Baths. Budapest is, for some reason, famous for having heated baths. I have no idea why, but I won’t question it, because they’re so nice! As someone who looks more like a dog than Michael Phelps when swimming I appreciated the baths, as it’s all about sitting around in warm water rather than who can do the most lengths. However, the main thing I loved about the baths was the architecture (which won’t surprise anyone), as the place is filled with beautiful stone columns and mosaic walls. Also, the wave pool is my fave thing ever and every home should have one.

 

Day two was again handed over to Natalia, as our Eastern European tour guide. Armed with a map and vague plan we visited some of the main landmarks in the city. We started the day at St. Stephen’s Basillica, a very impressive Catholic church which heads up one of the city’s squares. After a scheduled ice cream stop (the plan was tight, snacking was only allowed in designated areas), we moved on to Budapest Castle – a personal architecture highlight. One of my favourite things is that on one side of the castle you get amazing views of the Danube, yet on the other you see the reality of the city – towerblocks and somewhat run-down housing. I found that a refreshing break from tourism, a reminder that these countries, however beautiful, still have a wealth of social issues.

After seeing the Hungarian Parliament Building we took a boat down the Danube to our lunch spot. In Budapest for whatever reason the public transport people have decided that adding boats to their offer is a fabulous idea. Whilst yes, we didn’t pay any more for it, I still didn’t like it. Boats are a bit terrifying in my opinion.

 

If you’ve ever seen anyone go to Budapest on Instagram you’ll know that one of it’s big highlights is ruin bars. Located in the Jewish Quarter, these bars are built into abandoned buildings, shops or lots, and they’re really damn cool. We visited Szimpla Kert, the biggest and oldest ruin bar, and I loved how eclectic the place was. I also appreciated a bit of traditional Hungarian Palinka (cherry brandy) to round off a lovely afternoon.

The final evening of the trip was spent climbing Gellert Hill, with the aim of watching the sunset with a picnic and drinks. Thanks to my classic bad luck it was very cloudy and even rained for a bit, so the sunset was basically impossible to see. But hey, we had alcohol to rectify the problem, so all was good. This evening was not only a trip highlight, but a life highlight. I sat surrounded by my best friends watching over the lights of Budapest, discussing life, our adventures and everything in between. It was honestly magical for me.

 

Fast forward a few hours and I’m asleep on the floor again, this time in Budapest International Airport. Our flights left at 6:30am, and because yet again the local transport was unhelpful, team UK had to arrive at the airport 6 hours early. I loved sleeping in the airport so much that I’m taking my snooze tour to Manchester Airport next month when I fly back from Milan and have to wait 6 hours for the first train home.

But Really Are You Eating Tho?

I pretty much made this whole section just so I can talk about veggie burgers. I really love veggie burgers. Anyway, we were looking for somewhere to eat on the second day as we had no plans, and after abandoning the meat eaters us vegetarians stumbled upon Istvanaffi. It’s like a combination of the choice at Subway and McDonald’s, except instead of Big Macs it’s oat burgers. Everything is vegetarian/vegan, it’s cheap, filling and delicious!

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Still dreaming about this meal

I literally have nothing else to put here because I’m almost certain every other meal I ate was from Tesco so… shout out to Hungarian Tesco and reminding me of doing my weekly shop in Durham?

 

And so the trip drew to a close, with me as usual not recovering fully before 7 days straight in work. I can’t pick a favourite city, but I know that I have so many favourite moments from this trip – from domesticated family arguments about carrier bags in the Budapest hostel to dance routines in a Czech carpark at 1am. Travelling does crazy shit to people, but I wouldn’t ever change it.

 

-Megan, listening to The Story So Far because pop punk isn’t dead (and I just got back into it)

Prague; tired legs, drunk bodies, cultured minds

Hello lovely people!

Onwards and upwards with more adventures from my European trip. Round 2 for my tour team signified my return to Prague, a city which firmly stole my heart this time around. It’s a beautiful city, with a much more traditional feel than Berlin. But, perhaps more importantly, the beer is cheaper… (thanks Eastern Europe).

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John Lennon Wall; the perfect opportunity for our first full group picture

How It Went Down

The team arrived in Praha Hlavní Nádraží at 9:30pm, leaving our new German friend (who had spent the whole journey laughing at our idiocy) behind. More importantly at this point my lovely college wife (don’t ask, I’ll explain later) Oana joined us; you bet I jumped on her in the station. We then walked to our hostel as it wasn’t so far from the station, checked in and made it our home for the next 2 nights.

The Hostel

This might be one of my favourite hostels I’ve ever stayed in. A Plus Hostel cost the equivalent of €18 a night, and god was it worth every cent.

We shared an eight bed room which was very spacious, and even had the exciting added extra of a table (you know you’ve done too much budget travelling when even a table excites you). The main thing I loved about the room was that the four bunk beds were arranged in a circular fashion, which made it much more communal than the traditional rows often used by hostels. It’s the little things.

LET ME TELL YOU ABOUT THE SHOWERS. After living in a flat with shower pressure that was more dripping hosepipe than hair-washing for a year this hostel’s showers felt like you were being pelted in the face, it was so good! The boys would like to make it be known that the men’s showers didn’t have curtains though, something which I only heard about once or twice (or eight times…).

Two words. Free. Breakfast. I’ve been disappointed by far too many hostel’s offer of a bit of bread and some weak juice to feel anything but apprehension for that kind of advertisement, but this breakfast was mad good. Cake, coffee, meats, bread, fruit, yoghurt, and a toastie machine (!!!) was a perfect way to wake up everyday. Oh and did I mention that this was all served in an underground bar/restaurant with the coolest aesthetic ever?

My final plus because this section has gone on for far too long already is that the hostel is located across the road from Florenc metro station, making travel super easy. However, it’s also a short walk away from most of the city’s main attractions, so we only found ourselves using the metro on our second day. When I next find myself in Prague I will definitely be staying at A Plus again.

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Look how spacious and communal it is! Fab fab fab hostel

Wait… What Actually Happened?

After arriving pretty late at night we woke up ready for a full day of sightseeing. As I said earlier we chose to do it all on foot, which definitely felt fitting in an older city. We saw all of the main sights thanks to our fabulous Eastern Europe correspondent Natalia, from the Astronomical Clock to Charles Bridge, the John Lennon Wall and Old Town Square. The main thing I loved about doing this was the wandering; cute little side streets, chilling in parks and getting to know each other on that level you never really get to until you travel together along the way.

After all that walking it only felt right to spend the evening sitting down. Naturally, we found a bar in which to do so. When I visited Prague for the first time in 2017 I stumbled upon U Vejvodu by accident when looking for somewhere cheap to have drinks on the last night of our trip. Turns out it’s a pretty big deal online, and more importantly it’s absolutely huge, with outdoor beer gardens as well as spacious indoor rooms. The night started with Czech beer costing a dangerous £1.50 a pint. Enter a lot of rounds of never have I ever, a few more rounds of beer, and we found ourselves at shots of tequila and absinthe. Safe to say I was a little worse for wear by the time we arrived back at our hostel…

My notes for day two start with the words “Big hill and tower – cool view but v hot”, which just about sums it up. The hill in question was Petrov hill, with stunning views across the whole city. Personally I was a bit out of it on this particular morning (no, it wasn’t due to the alcohol, which surprises even me), so I probably didn’t appreciate this opportunity as much as I usually would.

My highlight of the day was Prague’s beautiful Old Town, the area which surrounds Petrov hill. There we visited Prague castle, as well as spending a little more time taking in the architecture and general surroundings. If you take anything from this post, take that I love having a good wander and a good look at cool stuff.

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Natalia is wasted on Philosophy and Psychology, please harass @nataliagola on Instagram to become a full time tour guide

Obviously then we had to watch football come home, returning to our haunt from the night before for another beer alongside the game. To complete my middle-aged Englishman aesthetic I chose to put bets on this particular match (and by I, I mean Callum chose me some bets and I paid for them and pocketed the cash), bets which actually came through and won me £18. Thanks England, guess I’m a football fan now.

Our Unplanned Escape

Now, the plan was to leave Prague at around 9pm and take a night train onto our final destination; Budapest. Whilst this was only for half of the group due to the train being sold out, it seemed like a pretty solid way to wake up feeling refreshed in a brand new city.

Oh how wrong we were…

When the four of us arrived on the train, we were told (quite rudely, might I add), that our ticket had been booked for the wrong date. Arriving back on the platform we found that yup, our ticket was for the wrong month completely, after a nightmarish booking scenario involving lots of phonecalls and badly designed Czech websites. So, we obviously had to find another route.

We quickly discovered that the next train out of Prague that was heading to Budapest wasn’t until 6am the next morning. Now, I don’t know about you, but spending the night in an Eastern European train station was a little too on the terrifying side for me. There had to be another way. I mentioned earlier that only half of our group were taking the train, as the remaining four were opting for Flixbus, a Polish bus company who work just like National Express coaches in the UK.

FLIXBUS SAVED THE DAY; HELL YES! We were able to book four seats on the Flixbus our friends had been taking all along, and whilst it was a little bit of extra money and stress, personally I didn’t find the ordeal too horrific – it’s all part of the life of a traveller. There’s a lot of entertaining little stories to go along with the journey, but I think I’ll save those for the next post (hah, now you have to come back)

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Ok but Oana’s face is the biggest mood (Brno, near the Hungarian border, 6am)

So, that was Prague! A cultural gem best discovered on foot, with bar prices to die for thrown in for good measure. The city has definitely given me an appetite to see more of the Czech Republic – who knows where I’ll go next.

Come back next week to hear about my Flixbus “nightmare” (I’m still not sure if it was tragic or hillarious).

-Megan, listening to Mellow Pop on Spotify because I’ve gone mad