2019 Goals

I wish I could say I hated clichés, but the reality just isn’t true. Surely if millions of people do something they can’t be wrong, right? (I mean, thousands of people elected a Tory government and they certainly weren’t right, but the idea fits the narrative of this post so forget the actual logic here)

Today’s cliché is making goals for 2019. I’m writing these out on the 2nd of January, as for New Year’s Eve I ended up choosing to go to a party with Alex at the last minute. It was a fantastic night and I had a great time, but unsurprisingly had a little bit of a bad head yesterday and had to wait until today to start on my goals. I feel like that’s not just me though, New Year’s Day definitely doesn’t count.

1. Complete dry January
One of my friends from back home has done this before and is choosing to do so again, and this year I’ve decided to join him. As a university student drinking culture is literally everywhere, meaning I usually waste a lot of time and money on being drunk or hungover, and I’m getting a bit bored of it. There are certain situations I enjoy more with a drink sure (clubbing Meg, you mean clubbing, because you’re far too anxious to do it sober), but most times I don’t really need to be drinking. I also have a lot of uni work due in at the end of this month (which I definitely haven’t started oops), so I don’t have time to be spending days hungover at the moment.

2. Run 10k
I’ve been into fitness for quite a while, but over the winter period I abandoned running completely. Back in the summer I was capable of running around 7km and was really building up to getting to my longtime goal of a 10k race. However, now I’m struggling to even do a basic 5k, because I’ve been neglecting cardio and opting for weights and toning work. I loved running when I was into it though, so I’m going to get myself signed up for a 10k race and start training.

3. Read 40 books
This is a very silly goal. In 2018 I read 29 books, the most in a lot of years. So obviously the most natural thing is to decide to read way more than I’ve read in a year since I was probably about 14. Amazing job Megan.

4. Stop buying from Amazon
Amazon are an absolutely terrible company. Their record on workers’ rights is nothing short of shocking, and since I finally got around to joining a union on New Year’s Day (really it was about all I achieved that day) I’d feel like a huge hypocrite if I kept supporting such a parasitic company. They’re also horrifically bad for the environment. I’m going to finish reading what books I’ve already bought on the Kindle app then hopefully find a new option for ereading, if anyone has any ideas let me know!

5. Take a photo everyday
This time last year I decided to post everyday on Instagram. It lasted a few months, but I soon learned that my life really isn’t exciting enough to make it Insta-worthy every single day. As a result I just stopped taking pictures, which is quite frankly a bit dumb for someone like me who spends half of their life looking back at old pictures because they can’t remember what happened yesterday, let alone years ago. So I thought fuck it, I’m taking photos for me now, the sillier the better.

6. Become a better activist by learning from others & campaigning more
I’m a bit of a lefty guys, it’s no secret if you follow my Twitter. At the end of last year I started campaigning for the Labour Party and I absolutely love doing it. It’s fantastic to get out on the doorstep and talk to people about why I believe what I do, and with the likelihood of a General Election this year it’s going to be more important than ever if we want to elect a Labour government. I’d also like to keep being involved in student politics before I head out on my year abroad, and hopefully get involved in the trade union I just joined. I just want people to have better lives, it’s really quite simple.

7. Practice my languages more
For someone who’s probably moving to South America at the end of the year, my Spanish really isn’t all that great. Or rather, I have zero confidence in speaking it whatsoever. I need to read and watch more in my non-native languages, as well as try and seek out more opportunities for speaking practice (I’m looking at you Amy, we need to reinstate cuppa & French/Spanish chats). I wish learning a fourth language was on this list, because after Milan and Berlin I’m absolutely dying to learn Italian or German, but I need to be patient and get good at the three I already speak.

 

I think that’s all. It sounds ridiculous to say this at such an early point in the year, but I have a good feeling about 2019. I’m in a very good place, and have so many exciting travels planned, which is all I could ever ask for really. What are your main goals this year?

-Megan, listening to a playlist entitled “Alternative Love Songs” (no, I’m not sure why either)

Advertisements

My Europe Bucket List

Hello lovely people!

Can I get political for a second? Fuck Brexit. I hate it and everything it stands for, whether that be nationalism, anti-immigrant sentiment or economic liberalism. I hate that it stands in the way of defining myself first and foremost as a European citizen, and I hate that it’s almost certainly going to restrict my future. I absolutely adore Europe with all my heart, and I want to continue roaming around it’s streets forever.

My trip to Milan this week has inspired me to keep travelling, regardless of what my government want to do to stand in my way. Travelling alone has helped me find my feet and discover some amazing things and places; if I’m honest I just want to drop everything right now and disappear across Europe on my own for a while. I’ve spoken to people doing round-the-world trips, interrails, or travelling for work, and I want to do it all. So, this is where I want to go.

europe bucket list

1. Copenhagen, Denmark
Milan was very nearly Copenhagen. The flights were just as cheap and even more convenient, but accommodation and mere existing was a little out of my budget for this trip. Scandinavia isn’t an area I’ve ventured into as yet due to the aforementioned high prices, but for some reason I’m drawn to Denmark. Perhaps it’s the canals, perhaps it’s the Scandi lifestyle; whatever it is I’m determined to make it there.

copenhagen

2. Rome, Italy
Having visited Milan, Como, Verona and Venice I’ve absolutely fallen in love with Italian culture. The people are always welcoming, aperativo is the best idea anyone ever came up with, and their relaxed approach to life is something I hugely envy. I’ve chosen Rome because I’ve been recommended it a thousand times over, and it’s historical sights look amazing. Perhaps this is a linguistic trip for if I ever learn Italian…

rome

3. Andalusia, Spain
Considering Spanish is my third language I’m honestly ashamed that the only time I’ve ever visited Spain was to a holiday resort when I was about 12. It’s just never quite made it; too far off-route for my 2017 interrailing trip and too expensive for this month. My current vibe is for the region of Andalusia. After studying Frederico Garcia-Lorca in first year and getting deep into Andalusian history and culture it’s been somewhere I’ve been dying to visit.

cadiz andalusia

4. Bordeaux, France
If you know anything about me, you’ll know that my heart is firmly in France. I aim to settle there and after 3 years of exchanges over in Brittany I have a huge group of friends in that area. However, I’ve never been further south than La Rochelle, which is a huge regret of mine. Add my love of wine into the mix and Bordeaux just seems logical to me. It’s near the coast and next to a national park too so I’d love to do a more relaxed holiday there someday.

bordeaux

5. Moscow, Russia
This is the only place on this list that I’m not wholeheartedly down for. Russia (quite understandably I think) absolutely terrifies me. As an overt member of the LGBTQ+ community I’m not sure if I want to visit a country that still persecutes people like me everyday. However, I’m also big into my cold war/communist history, and Moscow really is the centre of that. Maybe someday.

Moscow

7. Cologne, Germany
I loved visiting both Munich and Berlin, but I’ve never been further west in Germany. I’d really love to see how that compares to the Bavarian culture of Munich and the heavily modernised Berlin, as well as explore the Rhine valley whilst there.

cologne

8. Barcelona, Spain
I keep saying that I don’t need to go to Barcelona, because as a linguist it’s pretty useless to me, being that its inhabitants speak Catalan. However, I don’t speak the languages of most of the countries on this list, and that doesn’t make them any less viable as destinations. I really want to see the sights of Barcelona, and after hearing stories from countless friends and family members I’d love to see how great it is for myself.

shutterstock_barcelona_sagrada_familia

9. Kosovo
Kosovo is politically quite turbulent, which I think is a great shame. It has a pretty negative image as a result of its civil war in the late 90s and self-declaration of independence from Serbia (which, as an aside, Serbia still doesn’t recognise, that’s nuts), but if you take just one look at it’s geography all of this blurs into insignificance. The countryside of Kosovo is absolutely stunning, and whilst it’s not the conventional walking route I’d love to hike in it’s mountains.

kosovo

10. Paris, France
9 is an annoying number so I’m adding Paris because it’s my favourite city in the world and I constantly want to be back there.

20170706_100157.jpg

This is by no means an exhaustive list, as given the chance I’d love to visit every corner of Europe. It’s just the places I’m dreaming of right now, as year abroad saving has pretty much halted all my travel plans until summer 2019. Have you visited anywhere on my list? Where do you want to visit next?

-Megan, listening to the new The Story So Far album (hint, it’s awesome) in Milan airport (guess who got inspired after a week off)

 

*all pictures in this post were sourced from Google Images, except the final image which is my own